“MONDAYISATION” – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

In 2014 the Holidays Act was amended to allow for the Mondayisation of ANZAC day and Waitangi Day. All around the country Monday to Friday workers rejoiced as they would no longer miss out on a precious day off when public holidays fell on a weekend.

I hate mondays

The issue becomes how it impacts businesses and employees.

Trading Restrictions

Trading restrictions apply on the day the day the holiday falls. This means that for this year shops that are not exempt must be closed before 1pm on ANZAC day. No trading restrictions apply on Monday 27 April.

If The Employee Normally Works Saturdays

If the Employee normally works Saturdays, but you do not require them to attend work then you must pay them their normal day’s pay.

If the Employee normally works Saturdays and you remain open then you must pay them time and a half for the hours they work, as well as a day in lieu to be taken at a later date to be agreed upon between the parties.

If The Employee Normally Works Mondays, But Not Weekends

If the Employee does not work weekends then the holiday transfers to the following Monday.

If the Employee normally works Mondays, but you do not require them to attend work then you must pay them their normal day’s pay.

If the Employee normally works Mondays and you remain open then you must pay them time and a half for the hours they work, as well as a day in lieu to be taken at a later date to be agreed upon between the parties.

If The Employee Normally Works Saturdays And Mondays

An Employee is not entitled to “double-dip” on the public holiday. They only get the entitlement once. Therefore if the Employee works Saturdays the holiday is treated as falling on that day and the rules above apply. Monday becomes a normal day for them.

If you require further advice on this contact BuckettLaw and we’ll be happy to assist you with making sure you get it right and everyone is getting the right entitlements.

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